The Art of Dying

We know how to greet a baby into this world. It would be wonderful to have the same knowledge about when we leave this world.  

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 56 million people die every year around the world. With such a significant number of people dying each year, you would think that there would also be a substantial amount of knowledge concerning how to cope with death.

In today’s society, we tend to have as little contact as possible with death. Instead, we are usually encouraged to live as if we are never going to die. We are internally focused, more geared toward self-realization, personal potential, and individual gain. This drive to live fully has created a generation that lacks the necessary language and coping skills for dealing with death and grief.

After surviving my battle with stage three colon cancer, I experienced a period of devastating loss, where cancer took the lives of five friends. Four of them passed away at a sterile Hospital. It was shocking for me to witness first-hand the lack of support, for people in that situation. I realized how important it is to educate and support the relatives of a dying person. The more the caregivers know about the final stages, the better they can help the dying person and their families. 

For a person who has learned that their time is now limited, the feelings of shock and fear can seem to disable. For loved ones, accepting that a dying person has only limited time left is heartbreaking.

I consider writing the "Art of Dying" my most important book so far. Faced with a terminal diagnosis, yet little guidance on how to cope with what comes next, both patient and loved ones can feel lost in the storm of emotions, uncertainty, and fear that follow.

I am not an expert in how to die or how to live with a terminal illness, but I have been close to dying three times.  I became the sole survivor of six mothers all cancer patients, and saying goodbye, being there, and still, in the presence of death (it could be me in a few month), it taught me a lot about the final stages of life. How important it is to be educated, to prepared.

The Art of Dying is a practical, spiritual and inspirational self-help book for terminally ill people and their loved ones. The heart of the book is the advice and voices of people who have since passed away and from people who supported their loved ones until the end.

For a person who has learned that their time is now limited, the feelings of shock and fear can seem to disable. For loved ones, accepting that a dying person has only limited time left is heartbreaking.

With heartfelt compassion for you and yours,

Susan Binau

About Susan Binau
Susan is a motivational speaker, published author, and survivor of cancer and other life-threatening illnesses that changed her perspective on life. 
Her mission is to inspire others through "hands-on tools," educational programs, coaching and self-help books.